Sunday night ‘sext’ messages ruining traditional booty calls

12:56 a.m.: Hey. What u doin

12:58 a.m.: Nothin. U

1:06 a.m.: Prb about 2 watch a movie.

1:07 a.m.: Ok.

1:30 a.m.: Want to join?

What used to be referred to as “booty calls” have transformed into text messages – the art of “sexting.”

Remember being a little kid thinking that by hiding under the sheets and covering your ears, the monster under your bed couldn’t see you? What you couldn’t see or hear didn’t exist, right? But now that we are all grown up, why does text messaging still fall into this category?

Often people refuse to recognize that when sending a text message, they’re communicating with a living, breathing human being. Even though the person you’re texting can’t hear you, they can see right through you – if they only want to.

The computer mediated communication theory says the absence of social context clues is the major distinction between computer-mediated communication and face-to-face conversation. The theory emphasizes that participants in a computer-mediated conversation often lose attention easily because there is no one physically present to stop them from doing so.

This could be where mass text messaging, or “sexting,” comes into play. For example, you receive a “sext” and 30 seconds later all of your roommates receive the same one. There are a multitude of things that fuel these “sext” messages and most have to do with alcohol.

To someone who has just taken a shot of liquid courage, a text message is nothing more than a “Hey. In case you’re not thinking about me, now you will.” What people would never say to someone face-to-face they usually don’t think twice about sending in a text message.

One of my recent personal favorites was “I’m a cuddler. You like to cuddle?” Of course, the classic “sext” is one that is sent at 2:30 a.m. Sunday night, “What r u doin?”

What do think I’m doing? Probably sleeping.

Although text messages may be more convenient, nothing will replace a genuinely-placed phone call – drunk or not. G2G.

Sonya Cisneros is a senior news-editorial journalism and communication studies major from Fort Worth.